Tag: pads

Boxing buddy: Strength in numbers.

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When you’re training sometimes it is clear to see how beneficial having someone else there to train with can be! At least it is for me, if I’m on my own in the gym, I will push myself as far as I feel I can physically go, and then some. The same applies to when the gloves are on, if you’re not on the verge of your limits you’re not working hard enough. However, sometimes it is so beneficial to have a mate or training partner with you, for numerous reasons! To begin with, if you’re in the gym and you’ve got someone spotting you than you mentally feel more comfortable and driven to push your limits and hit those new personal bests, because the fear of being stuck with a weight on you that you can’t lift is gone! It’s a similar case in the boxing gym with the gloves on. There’s only so much you can do on your own, sure you can use the bag or some weights but if you’ve got someone there to do some pad work with than you can get in some of that crucial technique practice that you otherwise wouldn’t be able to do alone! In addition to this, it works both ways they’re not just there to help you, you’re also there to help and push them! With someone there to shout at you and say you’re not a quitter you will have the drive to push further and break those boundaries! Check out how beneficial having a pad work or sparing partner can be be with this quick video right here!

Boxing has more than just benefits in the ring.

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As mentioned in the previous post, many people automatically assume that all boxers are going to be mean, aggressive people who will go out of their way to cause trouble and start fights. This is in most cases completely wrong and in this post we are going to in fact discuss how boxing can be credited for helping get young, at risk individuals off the street and into sport thus making them safer individuals. It has been clear for some time that boxing gyms have helped to tackle youth crime due to the fact that the attract at risk individuals because of the violent nature of the sport, but once they’re there they realise and soon learn that fighting should be kept within the ring, once you leave the ring you leave the anger and you’re back to being a gentleman! This has been reflected in numerous news articles such as this one that can be found here. As mentioned on the article, boxing can be praised for helping take vulnerable children off the street and into a safe, crime free environment, which then in turn creates more potential for sport in the area as more people get involved. So in summary, it is clear to see that sport can help bring a community together, so why not get involved too!?

Don’t bring a spoon to a knife fight: Make sure you’ve got the right gear.

equipmentNow it’s obvious that there is going to be certain pieces of gear and kit that you’ll need for boxing, the most obvious being a pair of gloves. But if you sit down and think about it there is more than you’d first expect. However, don’t fret! Most of this equipment is easy to get and can be bought for a reasonably cheap price. If we work our way form the bottom of the body to the top, the first thing you may need is a pair of boxing shoes. Now these aren’t completely necessary as any pair of sports shoes will suffice for light training but it is recommended that you have these for sparring and matches. These can be bought in most sports shops and can be found for a reasonable cheap price, I bought a pair made by Lonsdale, a reputable boxing brand, out of my local sports shop for less than £29.99. Following on from this, you may want to invest in a groin guard. This is padding that covers and protects your groin from any low shots from your opponent in sparring, think of it as a head mask for your groin. No one wants the breath taken out of them by a crotch shot. Moving up from this you would be wise to invest in some hand wraps. these are the tapes you see boxers wrap round their wrists and hands before they put their gloves on and their purpose is to help take the stress off your wrists and knuckles as over time constantly making hard contact between your hands and something such as a person or bag will put heavy work on them. These can be bought from any sports shop or alternatively online and are dirt cheap, I bought a pair for £3.99 from my local sports shop. Next up you’ll need the most obvious item, your boxing gloves. These are the item you should put the most research into before you buy them because they come in so many variants. You can buy gloves intended for fighting, sparring, or pad and bag work in particular, in numerous ounce weights. In addition to this, some will obviously be better in terms of quality than others. Since your gloves will be the only thing between your knuckles and what you’re punching it can be worth while pushing the boat out and buying slightly more expensive gloves, to make sure you don’t injure yourself.

Next up you will need a mouth guard. This won’t be necessary for pad and bag work but any sensible gym coach wont let you step foot in a ring to spar or fight without a mouth guard. You don’t want to lose any of those pearly whites! Finally, this is optional an many gyms may even provide you with one but it can sometimes be worthwhile looking into getting a head guard for sparring. This is because if you’re not in a competitive fight and only training, you don’t want to run the risks of getting unnecessary injuries!

The Bag is your friend, but treat it like your enemy.

 

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When it comes to training, obviously practice makes perfect. You won’t become a champ overnight. When it comes to training you may not necessarily always have someone there with you to do pad work or to guide you. Because of this the bag is your best friend. He’s an inanimate object, you can’t hurt him, you can’t tire him and you can’t break his will. because of this the bag is one of your best training partners! I love the bag because you can’t get personal, you can unleash all your aggression and it isn’t going to hold a grudge against you where as you can’t unleash a relentless barrage against a light sparring partner. In addition to this, you can practice near enough any punch on a bad and due to there being so many different types you can master any technique. As well as the punch bag you can also put in some work on a speed bag. For those who do not know what this is it’s the small tear drop shaped bag that hangs from the side of a wall and you rapidly punch it in circular motions to help increase your hand speed.

To better show how to use a speed bag here is a clip of World champion ex-boxer Floyd Mayweather Demonstrating how to use one to increase hand speed: 

Go down swinging: Get to grips with uppercuts and hooks.

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Last time we covered the basics and how to build from the ground up with basic jabs and punches. This week we’ll build up on that and concentrate on hooks and uppercuts. As said last week, they key to learning these quickly and effectively is to start slow, forget about applying power to the swing and slowly build up the speed, adding the strength and power as you go.

If we start with the uppercut, the best way to get to grips with this punch is to take up the basic boxing stance discussed last time. Following from this you’ve got to consider what hand you’re throwing the punch with. If its your leading hand, your jab hand, that you’d drop your arm and rapidly bring it up with the aim of either sustaining a blow to your opponents stomach or head. As you raise your arm up you’d twist your front foot out slightly but quickly as it allows you to twist your body more, allowing a faster and more powerful punch. Its the same with your other hand although it’ll most likely be much more powerful, given that you twist the back foot out to allow the body to twist providing more power to the swing. An uppercut is arguably the most important punch when you’ve got your opponent against the ropes and you can unleash a barrage of blows to both the stomach and head while they try and protect themselves. Even if they put their arms around you to limit how many punches you can throw, it’ll be easier than a hook to successfully land a hit as you can go up the middle between the arms and hit critical areas.

Similarly to this, a hook is another type of throw that can have effective results on an opponent. It follows the same principle of the uppercut, if you’re swinging with your jab hand, you swing your arm out and twist the corresponding foot to allow more strength in the swing, if it’s your rear hand than you swing forward while twisting the rear foot. It’s best to try and keep your elbow bent at about 90 degrees, keeping your hand at shoulder height while throwing a hook as this will allow you to target either the body or the head, which ever is less protected and more vulnerable.

To show how effective uppercuts and hooks can be, here are 10 expert examples of world champion boxer Mike Tyson showing how they can be applied to devastate and knockout any opponent, arguably much more effective than any jab or cross: